What Is the American Dream? Part Two

Last month I gave my insights regarding a ProPublica article about how people over 50 won’t be the decision maker when they leave their job.  (Update, IBM is in the midst of a lawsuit for firing up to 100,000 people, targeting older workers. And there seems to be damaging testimony supporting the lawsuit’s premise.) A past American Dreams was to get a job at a large company, work there for 40-45 years, and retire with a gold watch and a pension. But no more, for most people.

I may be dating myself, but I remember in one college class a discussion about how another American Dream was to start a business and sell it to Sears. In those days, Sears was dominant and bought a lot of small businesses. However, a lot of those acquisitions were after Sears became the firm’s top (by far) customer and had the supplier “over the barrel.”

So, what is the American Dream these days? Actually, it should be “dreams” not “dream” as there are many versions. In early 2019 the New York Times had an opinion piece titled, “The American Dream is Alive and Well” with the sub-title of, “Most people in this country say that they are living it – but what they mean by the phrase might surprise you.”

The opening is, “I am pleased to report that the American Dream is alive and well for an overwhelming majority of Americans.” Here’s some interesting statistics:

  • Only 16% said to achieve the American Dream you have to be wealthy.
  • Only 45% said it means having a better quality of life than your parents.
  • And only 49% said it entails having a successful career.

Most interesting, 84% of Republicans and independents and 88% of Democrats said freedom was essential to it and less than 20% in either party believe becoming wealthy is essential. Many said it is experiences, not a lot of money, that bring happiness. With my clients, business ownership tops the list of desired experiences (and then getting out of business for their next great adventure in life).

Overall, all races, all levels of income, and all generations (from under 22 to over 70) are optimistic at an over 70% level. Also interesting is the Times published this during the Trump administration, which hates the Times.

Let’s move on to a Fast Company article titled, “We make $325,000 a year and don’t feel we have enough.” Catchy title but a bit misleading. Three case studies about people making $97,000 (Canadian), $171,000, and $325,000 show close similarities. 

The lowest income couple saves or has “leftover” funds of 12-20% (and a lot of Canadian safety net taxes), the other two have 30-40%. So, when the highest income couple says they feel they don’t have enough it’s because $125,000 is going to some form of savings or investment. Not bad. 

So, what’s my point, or points? Here are three:

  • It’s not as bad as the headlines – and things haven’t been as bad (or as good) as the headlines forever. Realize there are always pockets of people in a tough position no matter how good times are. But publicizing the positive doesn’t sell papers, get clicks, or get viewers. Then factor in social media, which magnifies everything and makes people think things are bad on a macro level. But when they discuss their own situation, i.e. the micro level, we get the results shown in the Times study.
  • We have different objectives – I’m guessing this hasn’t changed too much over the years and now it’s easier to collect information and publicize it so we have a lot more data and therefore insights. Different people strive for different things like money, power, prestige, spirituality, low stress, material goods, etc. No right or wrong and I applaud those who use our safety nets as a helping hand up to achieve their version of the American Dream.
  • Business ownership – as per above, for many, and this includes all of my clients, owning a business is the experience they want. It can include financial benefits but also provides the experiences many want. Those experiences include being successful, helping customers, providing jobs, being creative, and more. As in part one of this two-part newsletter, page one of my book Buying A Business That Makes You Rich, there are numerous reasons besides money people want to buy/own a business.

Conclusion

There is still opportunity everywhere. While it’s not for everybody, business ownership is the vehicle many want to maximize that opportunity, have the experiences they desire, and have a fulfilling life.

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