Developing Versus Developed (Countries)

I’m writing this from the island of Antigua where we’re here on a Rotary service project, “Improving Education Through Technology.” We have 10 Bellevue school district students from the technology program working on computer networks and installing Wi-Fi networks.

There are similarities and differences between Antigua and the US. Some of the similarities include:

It doesn’t matter where you are, people are people. Some are different colors, different sizes, have different customs, etc. But they all (pretty much) care about each other, their country, their friends, and families. We are warmly greeted here by not only the local Rotarians but people at the car rental place, hotel staff, restaurant staff, and others. It’s like we’re old friends.

There’s a lot of growth in both countries. Seattle leads the US in cranes and Antigua has numerous new buildings, businesses, and restaurants since we were here last year, just not as high.

The roads suck in both places and traffic stinks. We saw a bumper sticker here today reading, “Not Drunk, Avoiding Potholes.” Not enough capacity, poor upkeep, limited planning – it seems to be universal – with road construction everywhere.

Some of the differences are:

There’s a lot more respect for leaders and authority here. Imagine this in the US: at a planning meeting Sunday one of the local Rotarians was talking about a meeting we had Monday with the Prime Minister. Even though the Rotarian is in the “other party,” when questioned he said how he would respect what the PM said as he was “my country’s leader.” Imagine a Democrat saying that about Trump or a Trump supporter saying that about a Obama or any future Democrat President.

The US, and especially areas like Seattle, are fortunate to have a lot of growth, capital to grow, and money in general. Things are pretty good all across the country. In Antigua, there’s a lot of impoverishment, menial jobs, and limited opportunity. If some think there’s a huge divide in the US they should check out places like Antigua.

We’re here because there’s a great need. The Ministry of Education has pretty much said they won’t support the primary schools with technology. This includes helping the teachers improve themselves so they can teach better using technology and the many applications now available. The students know more about tech devices and how to use them than most of the teachers – and they want to learn via their devices, not via the old blackboard.

“Human relationships are vast as deserts. They demand all daring.” John Ruskin

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.