Decisively Solving Problems (Without Overreach)

“I hate lawyers” was how a client answered the phone. No hello, hi John, or similar. Just, “I hate lawyers.” And obviously not referring to any of my good lawyer friends (the lawyers he referenced are in the Midwest).

So what brought this on? The lawyers were overstepping their boundaries. Wordsmithing little things back and forth, trying to make it their deal by changing deal terms, and painting a “doom and gloom” picture for every little issue. It got to the point the client would write things like, I know what you’re going to say [kill the deal was a common reply from the attorney] but I’ve researched it and understand the risk.

It brings up the question, what are you doing for your client or customer? Simply, all of us, whether it’s advice, a service, or a product are solving a problem. If we can’t solve the problem, it’s not the right situation (and a fast no is almost as important as a yes-we-can).

We do this by asking questions and know we’re on the right track when we hear responses like:

  • That’s a good question.
  • I never thought of that.
  • Interesting.

And the best response being, “You ask great questions that get me thinking.”

A product solves the problem or it doesn’t. Advisory work is different, you give advice, tell your client what to do, and hope they’ll do it. A coaching client told me she would ask the client which of two strategies they liked best and my response was she’s getting paid to give guidance not simply point out options. Tell the client what’s the best option and why.

Despite the opening to this memo, I really like the attorneys I know, refer to, and work with. Someone at some time has said the same thing about accountants, consultants, coaches, salespeople, engineers, doctors, and just about any other profession. Ask questions, listen, and give good advice.

“A day can really slip by when you’re deliberately avoiding what you’re supposed to do.” (Cartoonist Bill Watterson)

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