Politicians, Businesspeople, and Rotary’s 4-Way Test

As we experience the holiday season with Peace on Earth, Goodwill to All, Thanks(giving), and the meaning of all this, I want to share my thoughts on what I consider to be one of the best codes of ethics around. It’s Rotary’s 4-Way Test and how I see it applying to politicians and businesspeople.

The 4-Way Test is:

  • Is it the truth?
  • Is it fair to all concerned?
  • Will it build goodwill and better friendships?
  • Will it be beneficial to all concerned?

Is it the truth?

Politicians – I think I could stop here because we all know they all lie, about everything. We have a President who sets the standard with over 12,000 verified false or misleading claims. Politifact states Obama made about 14% the number of “pants on fire” lies as Trump (yes, Democrats and Republicans, they all lie). Here in Seattle a Seattle City Council member, on the Berkeley “ban natural gas” bandwagon, stated a natural gas stove poisons the air in the house. A University of Washington scientist debunked that one pretty quick.

Business – My experience is most businesspeople are pretty truthful, other than owners who blend their business and personal checkbooks. They may write off some personal expenses but do report their income. When it comes time to sell, most care about their legacy (they want the buyer to succeed) and really care about their employees thriving with the new owner.

Is it fair to all concerned?

Politicians – Again, pretty simple as they only care about getting re-elected and the people who can help them accomplish that. This means donors and lobbyists not you or me.

Business – Most really care about their employees and customers. Yes, some (way less than 50%) are greedy, pay low, don’t provide benefits, etc. One telltale sign is often the retirement plan. If it has 95% going to the owner, you have to watch out for that person. 

Will it build goodwill and better friendships?

Politicians – Yes, if you’re a donor, a donor’s business, or a donor’s cause. Otherwise, you’ve got to be kidding.

Business – Small business is relationship business. You can’t succeed if there’s not goodwill between employer and employees, the business and its customers, vendors, and service providers. Face it, customers usually have options. In today’s labor market employees have a lot of options (on my list of the top four things an owner can do to prepare the business for sale is, “Show you can attract and retain great talent.”

Will it be beneficial to all concerned?

Politicians – You know my thoughts on this. See the above three sections. If it’s beneficial to the politician they’ll do it (often meaning they’ll do what the Party tells them to do).

Business – If you’re in business, large or small, you must be able to solve problems, meaning beneficial to your customer, your vendors, and you. Try making a promise like a politician and not delivering on it (we’ll have your order out by the end of the month but when it’s two months late you’ll lose the customer). Things must be beneficial to employees also, or they’ll leave. Most want career advancement and want to be able to take pride in their work.

Conclusion

It’s the holiday season and this is a fun essay. I’m sure you picked up on the general theme, we businesspeople have a higher ethical standard than those we elect. As you give thanks on Thanksgiving, wish friends and family Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukah, and Happy New Year, realize it’s best to carry all those feelings throughout the year, not just in December.

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