All You Need to Know About COVID Era Banking

From June 4-10 Jessica and I interviewed bankers representing eight Puget Sound area banks.* This memo is a synopsis of those conversations about what’s going on in banking during the COVID crisis, with a focus on business acquisition loans.

If you want the full report, click here to get it. It’s in table format so you can easily see what each banker said on the various topics.

First, all the banks are, “Open for business” meaning they are considering making loans. What’s changed is underwriting is going to take longer and will be more thorough (my comment – underwriting wasn’t sloppy before COVID, especially compared to the years leading up to the Great Recession). COVID will be a focus of all analysis and underwriting, where the business was pre-COVID, how it was affected, what the future looks like.

Year-to-date monthly statements are extremely important. The banks recognize there are a lot of unknowns and realize we all fear the unknown to varying degrees. Projections will be scrutinized more than ever and owners and buyers who can present thoughtful projections, answer questions realistically, and not gloss over the current situation will be in a more favorable position. 

My accounting and CFO friends will like the following: the quality of the financial statements has never been more important. Some banks will look at the accounting department, ask if there’s a CFO or controller, and use that in their decision-making process. Having the owner’s sister-in-law who’s really a data-entry person but called the controller won’t cut it.

And, no surprise, there will be more sensitivity analyses and stress tests. Mentioned a few times was the figure “30%,” as in, what will the business, its cash flow, and debt coverage look like if revenue goes down 30%. As part of this, banks that previously did more conventional loans will now be looking to use the SBA 7A program (for its guarantees to the bank).

Consistently mentioned was how important relationship is (the PPP showed this) as well as how borrowers with known and quality advisors will be looked upon more favorably. It was said the source of the referral matters and if advisors are involved it’s a big plus. A few people encouraged borrowers to talk to multiple banks, find the right fit, talk holistically about how banking works, and have thoughtful questions and answers. Especially in regard to how the business is handling the COVID stress.

* Bankers who helped us

  • Banner Bank – Lynell Smith & Jacque Coyan
  • Columbia Bank – Jeff Wilcox
  • Heritage Bank – Addie Roberge
  • Key Bank – Jane Pekasky & Jennifer Ringenbach 
  • Live Oak Bank – Lisa Forrest
  • NW Bank – Gary Strand
  • Sound Credit Union – Donna Himpler
  • WA Trust Bank – Kit Gerwels

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