Early Retirement, Forced Retirement, What Retirement

There was a column in the Seattle Times Sunday business section a few months ago titled, “Early Retirement Can Be Hazardous.” This was a financial column, so the focus was on running out of money. It triggered the thought about what exactly is retirement and why there is so much focus and advertising about it.

The government created the concept of retirement as we know it when Social Security was started in the 1930’s. At the time, the typical life expectancy of a male age 65 was age 68-70. It was also the middle of a long depression, which really didn’t end until the start of WW II. By giving citizens a retirement stipend, it was a way to get older people out of the work force and create job openings for younger people.

Now the life expectancy of a 65-year-old male is about 18 years and for a female it’s about 20 years (from the Social Security Administration website). We also have a shortage of qualified workers so there’s no need to push people out of the workforce.

If the government created the concept, then the financial services industry popularized it. Radio ads, TV ads, print ads, workshops, webinars, etc. tells me there’s a lot of money to be made helping people retire. (And studies say most people don’t save much money.)

So it was refreshing to hear an owner say, “I don’t buy into the concept of retirement as most people think of it. I’ll always want to be doing something.” My dad retired as soon as he hit age 62 because he hated, and I mean hated, his big corporate employee (he and many others had been let go 8-10 years earlier and won an age discrimination lawsuit, which got him his job back, but lost the company his loyalty).

When it comes to business owners contemplating selling, the most important question to ask is, “What will be your next great adventure in life?” Many haven’t thought of it. Something triggers the desire to sell but there’s been no planning.

Often it’s one of the following (assuming none of the 3 Ds, divorce, death, or disability/health issue):

  • They started the business to work on the widget and now are managing a few dozen people, and they don’t like managing people.
  • They’re burned out because they haven’t built a management structure, i.e. they don’t delegate. *
  • They’re bored and want a new challenge.
  • They’ve lost the battle at home, i.e. their spouse wants them out.

It’s funny how we want our favorite authors to keep writing, musicians to keep playing, actors to keep acting, and yet people always ask others when they’re going to retire, as if it’s a badge of honor to stop contributing.

“I don’t believe in retirement. Everybody who retires too early dies too early.” (Sportswriter) Dan Jenkins

* As per my friend Allan VanderHamm’s recent newsletter, a dependency on the owner reduces the company’s transferable value, meaning when the owner leaves too much of the business leaves. (and the price is lower).

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