Are You Funny?

I attended an event recently and witnessed one of the speakers do the following:

  • Start out with a joke that fell absolutely flat. Then he explained the joke and guess what, it didn’t get any better.

Then, during his talk he made a couple non-sensical statements, again trying to be funny. One that caught my attention brings up a good lesson on PR. He said he has seen a lot of articles that are really lists, as in, the top 10 things to do, the top 7 things to not do, etc. His “funny” comment was about how the writers must be doing this to get search engine hits.

Well, not really. They’re doing variations of the “Top 10 list” because:

  • PR experts say lists attract people’s attention (they do).
  • The authors want to attract the attention of reporters and if you want to get interviewed or quoted you need to be attractive to reporters (reporters love lists).
  • Negative lists are what capture the most attention, like, “The Seven Traps That Snare Business Buyers and Sellers.” (Reporters especially love things to avoid because they resonate with readers because most people prefer to avoid a mistake over doing something right.)

If you’re not naturally funny, don’t try to be. And, when joking about something, make sure you know what the heck you’re talking about.

Networking and Friends

In her March 16, 2019 Wall Street Journal column, Kids, Don’t Become Success Robots, Peggy Noonan wrote about the recent college application scandal. Her emphasis was about how when parents cheat the kids believe cheating is normal and will have regrets doing so.

She told a story about speaking at an Ivy League school and being surprised because the students didn’t want to talk about any subjects or doing high-quality work (to succeed in life0 but about networking. Not networking as we think of it, but as “how can I use other people to benefit me.” She tried to explain it’s about the quality of the work you do and asked them, “Why don’t you just make friends?”

She came away disillusioned and felt the students had been trained to be shallow and see others as commodities.

So, what does that have to do with you and me? We think of networking a way to have a win-win relationship. It’s not taking advantage of others, it is making friends in order to help each other. It’s pretty easy to spot people who care more about themselves than their clients, their referral sources, or anybody else. I look at my referral tracking list and realize the vast majority come from people I consider friends. People with whom I would enjoy having a cup of coffee, a beer, or a meal.

My takeaway from this is if your objective is to get to know others better and understand how you can help them, you’ll end up being rewarded in the long run.

“Do not network. Make friends. Learn about the lives of others.” Peggy Noonan

Developing Versus Developed (Countries)

I’m writing this from the island of Antigua where we’re here on a Rotary service project, “Improving Education Through Technology.” We have 10 Bellevue school district students from the technology program working on computer networks and installing Wi-Fi networks.

There are similarities and differences between Antigua and the US. Some of the similarities include:

It doesn’t matter where you are, people are people. Some are different colors, different sizes, have different customs, etc. But they all (pretty much) care about each other, their country, their friends, and families. We are warmly greeted here by not only the local Rotarians but people at the car rental place, hotel staff, restaurant staff, and others. It’s like we’re old friends.

There’s a lot of growth in both countries. Seattle leads the US in cranes and Antigua has numerous new buildings, businesses, and restaurants since we were here last year, just not as high.

The roads suck in both places and traffic stinks. We saw a bumper sticker here today reading, “Not Drunk, Avoiding Potholes.” Not enough capacity, poor upkeep, limited planning – it seems to be universal – with road construction everywhere.

Some of the differences are:

There’s a lot more respect for leaders and authority here. Imagine this in the US: at a planning meeting Sunday one of the local Rotarians was talking about a meeting we had Monday with the Prime Minister. Even though the Rotarian is in the “other party,” when questioned he said how he would respect what the PM said as he was “my country’s leader.” Imagine a Democrat saying that about Trump or a Trump supporter saying that about a Obama or any future Democrat President.

The US, and especially areas like Seattle, are fortunate to have a lot of growth, capital to grow, and money in general. Things are pretty good all across the country. In Antigua, there’s a lot of impoverishment, menial jobs, and limited opportunity. If some think there’s a huge divide in the US they should check out places like Antigua.

We’re here because there’s a great need. The Ministry of Education has pretty much said they won’t support the primary schools with technology. This includes helping the teachers improve themselves so they can teach better using technology and the many applications now available. The students know more about tech devices and how to use them than most of the teachers – and they want to learn via their devices, not via the old blackboard.

“Human relationships are vast as deserts. They demand all daring.” John Ruskin

It’s what you don’t know that can hurt you

On our recent Rotary service project in Antigua one of the adults with us is a dedicated vegan, which is fine, and it’s because of a combination of allergies and health concerns.

I say dedicated because at one meal he found a little cheese in his salad and had a meltdown, dumping his whole plate of food. The next night pasta was on the menu and after we were done eating, I asked him why he eats pasta. He looked puzzled so I said it’s because most pasta has eggs in it.

His look was priceless, and he avoided pasta the rest of the trip.

We often make assumptions about things, including our customers, our products or services, what the customer wants, what’s important to employees, etc. when we should be asking questions. All my vegan friend had to do was read a pasta package label. We need to ask customers and prospective customers, what’s the objective? Or ask, why? (or why not?) they made certain choices.

Dead or Playing Possum?

In honor of Black Friday and Cyber Monday, and other big shopping days, here’s an opinion on the retail industry, trends, and sticking with it.

“What goes around comes around” is an old saying meaning things eventually return to their original value after some sort of cycle (and it’s a hit song by Justin Timberlake).

How long ago was it when every pundit and everybody you spoke with was saying “retail is dead?” Other comments included the Internet passed retailers by, the cost of stores is too high, people don’t want to shop, they want to get a package at their door, etc.

Guess what? A Wall Street Journal headline was, “Retail Stocks Roar Back On Consumer Strength.” The S&P Retail exchange-traded fund was up 16% this year at the time of the article and many major retailer stocks were up 30-50% this year (and are bouncing around like all other stocks). On September 4 The Seattle Times had a business section headline of, “Retail trends drawing shoppers into stores.”

Retailers seem be figuring it out. They took a hit, regrouped, found where they can shine, and appear to be doing so. Some of their tactics are new and some are the same as before including racks of clothes, fitting rooms, private brands, personal assistance (think Nordstrom not Walmart), etc.

Think about this in regard to your business. You can jump onboard with the latest greatest software, marketing program, manufacturing scheme, etc. but I’ll bet there are things you do the same way as before (or come back to them), because they work.

I recently spoke with the owner of a company that bids on jobs. I asked if they used any industry software or ERP system to bid. The answer was no, they use Excel and Access, because it works for them (to me working means the bids are right and they make money on their jobs). I’m not sure how time-efficient it is, but it works.

I remember from a past business life an industry leader talking about a marketing program and saying something like, it worked so well for so long we decided to do something different. If it works, keep doing it, but always look for ways to do it better.

“There seems to be some perverse human characteristic that likes to make easy things seem difficult.” Warren Buffett

Somethings are Just Out of Our Control

Two weeks ago, I received a couple positive comments about the memo sent that morning. A few people noticed it was dated September 18 and was the same content as the September 18 memo. So, I investigated.

For background, my process is:

  • Take a recent memo.
  • Delete the content.
  • Paste in the new content, link a different video, and change the date.
  • Send a test message to myself and edit if needed.
  • Schedule it.

First, I went in the Constant Contact system and yes, the memo dated October 9 was the one from three weeks prior. Second, I checked the test message I sent myself, and it was what was supposed to go out October 9. So sometime between the test and the scheduling the system reverted back, with me not having any way to know it.

Normally I would say these things happen because of human error (meaning I screwed up) but my test was correct and I also had my (almost) monthly newsletter scheduled to go out on October 11 and received an email from Constant Contact the next day saying technical issues prevented if from going out (with a lot of apologies in the message). Therefore, my assumption is, their system was at fault.

Things happen and some of them can’t be controlled. We have random acts of kindness and random glitches. You have to roll with the circumstances. The downside was I repeated a message. The upside is people noticed and I get to write this explanation. The old adage, control what you can control is true. Make sure you control enough to be effective.

“Control what you can, confront what you can’t.” (The band) Maine

Asking Why – A Great Question

I’m known in my family for constantly asking, “Why?” Others will say something about what they’re going to do, what they want to get, etc. and I’ll ask, Why?

Sometimes I get the answer, “Because.” And no, that’s not a reason why you want to do something.

  • A client told me if he had the money (at the time) he’d like to buy a larger machine. Why? It turns out because he likes big machines, not because the business needed it.
  • Years ago, one of my clients bought a business with way too much inventory. Why? Because the owner loved seeing full racks of stuff (and those full racks turned into cash with better management).
  • An owner had way too many employees. Why? Seems he didn’t want to work too hard, so he didn’t pay attention, and therefore made less money.

A client of mine, in a buy-sell deal, made it a (conscious) point of avoiding the why question by giving the answer in advance. For example, “This information is needed by Friday because (let’s say, to keep the bank on schedule).”

It’s a great simple one-word question to ask about marketing tactics, purchases, hiring, and much more.

“Even the smallest act of service, the simplest act of kindness, is a way to honor those we lost, a way to reclaim that spirit of unity that followed 9/11.”President Barack Obama

 

If You Want To You Will

I caught a small amount of the NFL Hall of Fame ceremonies on TV and was particularly drawn to Jerry Kramer’s acceptance speech. He mentioned how his high school line coach, after noticing him struggle, told him, “You can, if you will.”

At first he was befuddled by it. Then he figured it out, got a scholarship to the University of Idaho, won five NFL championships, was on the NFL’s 50thanniversary team, and now the HOF.

We can all, “Figure it out.” Now I can’t be a surgeon, engineer, lawyer, etc. but I’ve figured out how I can help others, be successful, contribute to the good of the whole, and have an enjoyable life – if I will do what it takes. One of my favorite lines, to clients and others, is, “If you do the things you’re supposed to do good things will happen.”

It doesn’t matter what your vocation, the above applies. The same holds for what you do with your family, community, and elsewhere. But it does take effort, perseverance, and (especially these days in our ever-faster world) urgency.

Kramer ended with some motivation from his coach, Vince Lombardi, which is the quote below. Sports, business, family, etc. all will thrive if you’ll do what you’re supposed to do.

“After the game is over, the stadium lights are out, the parking lot’s empty, you’re back in the quiet of your room, the championship ring on the dresser, the only thing left at this time is to lead a life of quality and excellence, and to make this old world a little bit better place because you were in it.” Vince Lombardi

Trust Versus Prospecting

I am getting really tired of people asking me to connect on LinkedIn and then prospecting me. What looks like a networking connection turns into a solicitation, without any knowledge of if I need, want, or are even qualified for what the person is offering.

Does it work? I don’t know but it seems like it’s the same as a cold call, a very cold call, and we know the low success rate of cold calls. Most people on LinkedIn are in some kind of relationship business and this is the complete opposite. You get to be a trusted advisor by earning trust.